Lobster Ravioli with tarragon cream sauce

lobster ravioliEvery family has its holiday menu traditions.  Our family celebrates the Réveillon, the night before Christmas with its special menu of Coquilles Saint-Jacques and soupe à l’oignon.  Come Christmas day we have a second family meal with a different menu of beef tenderloin with mushroom sauce, Bûche de Noel, and my signature lobster raviolis.  They are delicious, easy to make and can be served as a first course or a light meal with a tossed salad.  The tarragon cream sauce gives the dish that bit of acidity that complements the rich creamy lobster filling.  We did have them on the menu yesterday but you don’t need to limit yourself to Christmas to make them as they are a great addition to any menu year round.lobster ravioli ingredients

LOBSTER RAVIOLI  (makes about 62 raviolis)

  • meat from 2 1.5 pound lobsters ( about 14 to 16 oz of meat) chopped
  • 1/4 cup scallions chopped fine
  • 1 teaspoon grated lemon rind
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh tarragon
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 6 ounces cream cheese room temperature
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 62 wonton wrappers

In a large bowl mix the lobster meat, scallions, tarragon, lemon rind and juice.  With a fork, work the cream cheese into the lobster mixture making sure it is all incorporated and that there are no large lumps of cream cheese by using your hands to lightly mix.  Taste and season with salt and pepper if needed. Set aside.lobster ravioli stuffing

On a large clean working surface lay the wonton wrappers 10 to 12 at a time.  Put about 1/2 tablespoon in the middle of each wonton.  Fill a small bowl with warm water.  Dip your finger or a small pastry brush in the water and wet the edge of the wonton, fold into a triangle, and press the wet edges together sealing the filling inside.  Repeat until you have used all the filling. As you make the raviolis, put them on a baking sheet that has been dusted with a bit of cornstarch to avoid the raviolis sticking to each other or the surface. As you will have more then can fit the baking sheet, cover the first layer loosely with a piece of wax or parchment paper also dusted with cornstarch.  When done loosely cover with plastic wrap and put in the fridge until ready to cook.lobster ravioli

When ready to cook, bring water to boil in a large pot.  Gently put the raviolis in the boiling water, 8 to 10 at a time ( do not crowd the pot)  for about 1 to 2 minutes.  The raviolis come to the surface when cooked.  Remove with a slotted spoon and serve in individual shallow bowls or plates with a couple of tablespoons of sauce.

TARRAGON CREAM SAUCE

  • 10 to 12 peppercorns
  • 2 branches fresh tarragon
  • 1 cup dry white wine
  • 1.5 cup vegetable broth
  • 1 small shallot chopped
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 3 tablespoons flour
  • 1/2 cup heavy creamcooking lobster ravioli

Put the peppercorn, tarragon, wine, broth and shallot in a small saucepan.  Bring to a boil and let reduce for about 20 minutes.  Pour the mixture through a fine mesh strainer, discard the solids and save the liquid.  In another small saucepan melt the butter, add the flour, and cook for 1 minute letting the flour absorb the butter.  Whisk in the broth and cook for 5 minutes letting the mixture thicken slightly.  Reduce the heat to low and slowly whisk in the heavy cream.lobster ravioli

NOTE:  The raviolis and the sauce can be made 1 to 2 days ahead.  Make sure that you don’t bring the sauce to a boil when reheating it as the cream can separate. Otherwise you can make the sauce and add the cream when ready to serve. As a first course I serve 4 to 5 raviolis per person.

From my kitchen to yours,

CK, la fille du boucher

Oysters!

oystersI will eat oysters over chocolate …and  I mean a good dark chocolate.  If I really want to “treat” myself, I’ll run to the store and buy a dozen oysters and we’ll have them as an appetizer with a nice glass of sparkling white wine.  It’s one of those foods that makes me happy – and fortunately my husband, Philippe, not only feels the same way, but is also the best at chucking! We are very partial to the oysters from Prince Edward Island and New Brunswick:  Malpeque, Caraquet, Raspberry Point, Beausoleil, French Kiss…  So when we visit my family in Montreal we make a stop at our favorite poissonnerie, Odessa, fill up the cart with oysters, and off we go to my parents.oysters at the market

All you need to enjoy your oysters is a proper knife and your favorite sauce. When it comes to the knife you need one with a sturdy blade – a nice point to open the oyster but also flat to get around the shell to open it.  As for the sauce, some use tabasco, lemon, or cocktail sauce.  I am partial to Mignonette Sauce.oyster and sauce

MIGNONETTE SAUCE

  • 1/2 cup red wine vinegar
  • 2 tablespoon finely chopped shallots
  • cracked pepper

Mix all ingredients in a small bowl and serve with the oysters.

NOTE: only eat oysters in a month with “r” ! Where does that come from? Oysters spawn from May to August and tend not to be as plump and flavorful.  Plus there is the added factor of eating raw seafood in the heat of summer and the fear of getting food born illnesses.chucking oysters

From my kitchen to yours,

CK, la fille du boucher